Metro buyer: Don’t skimp on the roof, it’s worth the cost

by SUSAN BLOWER Indiana Correspondent of United Metal Roofing & Supply ( 24-Sep-2015 )
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. — When a 90-foot-tall pine tree landed on his roof in
one of last month’s record Midwest
storms, Doug Masak found out how
strong his steel roof was.
When the stone-coated roof was placed
on his Michigan log home 10 years ago,
he was told it was rated to withstand
120-mile winds. None of the tiles blew
off, and now holding a fallen tree, the
roof still hasn’t leaked, Masak said.
“That roof is so strong, you could do a
Polish dance up there. A 300-pound
man can walk around. I’ve been up there
many times to blow off leaves and repair
the chimney,” he proclaimed.
Masak was one of the first Midwest
customers for Metro Roof Products, a
manufacturer of stone-coated steel
roofs. He said he researched on the
Internet for a durable roof. He is satisfied
the roof will not only outlast him but
will live up to its 50-year warranty.
In addition, the shape and coating
make the roof look just like a cedar
shake roof, he said. He has installed the
same roof on all five buildings on the
property, which has been in the family
for generations and whose buildings
were constructed with Michigan cut
logs.
“People can’t believe it’s a steel roof. It’s
just like I wanted. It’s a great roof, the
best anyone could buy. It’s not cheap to
put on, but it’s worth every penny,”
Masak added, proudly.
When rural residents think of a steel
roof, the image of a rusty sheet of metal
on an old barn may come to mind. But
like everything else, the steel roof has
made technical leaps in the last few
decades.
Metro Roof Products of Indy hopes to
broaden Midwesterners’ notions of steel
roofs. Metro, based in California, manufactures
stone-coated, 26-guage commercial
grade steel roofs guaranteed to
withstand wind, hail and fire.
Metro’s energy-efficient system features
an air gap between the sheeting
and the metal, which creates a barrier to
heat transfer into the house. This can
lead to a 30 percent savings in energy
costs, said Tom Sands, an independent
sales representative for Metro.
“It has the look of asphalt shingles,
with increased durability. While the lifecycle
is 50-plus years, asphalt lasts 15
years on average,” Sands said.
He travels throughout Michigan,
Indiana, Ohio and Illinois to expand the
Metro brand name in the Midwest. He
said most of his sales since he started
last fall have been in local markets,
where wind can be a greater issue for
roofs.
“With the overlap of the tiles, the wind
can’t get underneath. It is rated by
Energy Star for 120-mile winds, golfball-
sized hail and fire,” Sands said.
Metro Roof Products opened its factory
in Oceanside, Calif., in 2000. Its website
features testimonials from California
customers whose homes survived wildfires,
which they attributed to their steel
roofs.
At half the weight of a traditional
asphalt roof, the steel roof can be placed
over existing asphalt layers, leading to a
cleaner and safer environment, said Pete
Torzewski, owner of United Metal
Roofing Supply in Michigan.
“Metro Roofing likes to remind customers
that it’s a very green product. In
fact, over 20 to 40 percent of the roof
comes from your dad’s old car. Steel is
the most recycled product, and there are
no toxins in the coating. You could drink
the water from the roof and water your
garden,” he said.
The steel roof lasts 3-5 times as long as
a traditional asphalt roof, also leading to
a cleaner environment, Torzewski
added.
His experience as a supplier of stonecoated
steel roofing is that metal roofs
can last 75 years, while the selling price
is one-third to double the cost of an
asphalt roof, depending on contractor
charges. He said the price of asphalt
has risen dramatically in the past 20
years because of increased demands on
petroleum, from which the tiles are
made.
“A homeowner will pay a third more on
the material (for steel roofs). For example,
if asphalt costs $4,000, a stonecoated
steel roof will cost $6,000 in the
short term. In the long term, it is more
energy efficient, and you can save money
with tax credits and deductions on home
insurance,” Torzewski.
“When people find out about this, they
say, ‘Why haven’t I heard about this?’
Homeowners are driving the market.
They are asking for installers. It’s hard to
talk to every contractor, but this is the
future.”
Metal roofs make up 18 percent of the
market nationwide, Torzewski added.
Consumers like Masak are increasingly
researching their roofing options.
“Unlike some steel roofs, this steel roof
is not painted or slippery. I started investigating
myself, on the Web. I wanted to
make this summer home a year-round
dwelling – and I did,” explained Masak,
who is now 82 years old. “I want it to last
for the next guy, too.”
To Subscribe: Call 1-800-876-5133 Indiana-Illinois Farm and Outdoor Power Equipment Show FarmWorld — Wed., Dec. 11, 2013 — 13S
Metro buyer ...
(continued from page 12S)
THIS GUESTHOUSE, with its steel roof, is protected against wind, hail and fire. Even the wishing well in front is covered
with steel tiles. Doug Masak's roofing (also shown below) is designed to resemble a cedar shake style; other designs are
also available. (Courtesy of Doug Masak)
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